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Report: How Innovative Community Responses to COVID-19 Support Healthy Aging

A new report offers insights from communities’ response during the coronavirus pandemic and demonstrates their nimbleness in creating more inclusive and equitable systems to support older people. How Innovative Community Responses to COVID-19 Support Healthy Aging is the result of a collaboration between the Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs, Massachusetts Healthy Aging Collaborative and Tufts Health Plan Foundation.

The research, conducted by FSG, highlights strategies employed by communities and offers recommendations for stronger results moving forward. The report was funded by Tufts Health Plan Foundation.

Valuing the Invaluable 2019 Update: Charting a Path Forward

Part of the Valuing the Invaluable series on the economic value of family caregiving, this report updates national and individual state estimates of the economic value of family caregiving using the most current data available.  Source: AARP

Building Inclusive Communities: A Guidebook for Advancing Health Equity in the MetroWest Region

While the title and geographic scope of the foundation’s work resides in the MetroWest region, the definitions, data and tools available in this resource can be used by any community. It should also draw special interest from Age- and Dementia Friendly stakeholders that are convening and engaging community members, conducting community assessments, gathering data, and creating action plans.

A Report on Demographics, Programs, and Services for an Age- and Dementia-Friendly Commonwealth: What We Have and What We Need

The Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs, Jewish Family & Children’s Service, and
the Tufts Health Plan Foundation convened a summit on May 9, 2016 that brought together
leaders from 84 organizations interested in age-friendly and dementia-friendly work. A need identified at the Summit was for a comprehensive look at the work currently being done on agefriendly and dementia-friendly activities. This report addresses this need by highlighting findings of an environmental scan (i.e., in-depth inventory) of dementia-friendly and age-friendly communities conducted between August 2016 and January 2017 by a research team at the Gerontology Institute of the University of Massachusetts Boston led by professors Beth Dugan and Nina Silverstein. Our aim is to not “reinvent the wheel,” but to facilitate and accelerate stakeholder progress in making Massachusetts a great place to grow up and grow old in.

Connecting Generations in Senior Housing

This toolkit from the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston and Generations United provides practical information, guidance, and templates to help senior housing providers, and other organizations serving older adults, implement high-quality intergenerational programs that will benefit elders and young people in their communities. Continue reading

Tips for Advocates of Limited English Proficient Older Adults

Over five million older adults across the country are Limited English Proficient (LEP). LEP older adults do not speak English as their primary language or they have a limited ability to speak, read, write, or understand English. The number of LEP older adults is growing. Federal and state laws protect the vital right to receive health information in a language one understands. However, many barriers make it difficult for older adults to assert these rights, impairing their ability to understand their healthcare and make decisions. This ultimately leads to poorer health outcomes and health disparities. This Practice Tip offers advice to advocates and counselors working with LEP older adults to better assert their language access rights.

The Pets for the Elderly Foundation

Pets for the Elderly Foundation works to provide companionship to seniors through pet ownership, while also saving animals from shelters.

Addressing Health Equity in the Dual Eligible Demonstration Projects

Source: Diverse Elders Coalition
Report by Community Catalyst

“The healthcare world is changing; providers who have been serving a certain population are now serving a completely new population, a more diverse population. When you talk about cultural competency, what you really need to look at is what the customs, beliefs and values of these individuals are.”     Dr. Terri Mack-Biggs, Geriatrician, Hospice of Detroit, Michigan

Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired

The Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired’s (MABVI) mission is to work with individuals with vision loss to eliminate barriers and create opportunities. The MABVI website contains information about living with vision loss, community events, fact sheets, resources, volunteer opportunities and more.