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UMass Hosting Summit to Link Behavioral Health and Aging Services

With support from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs, UMass Boston’s Gerontology Institute is hosting a summit focused on building better collaboration between behavioral health providers and aging services.

Featured speakers include Elder Affairs Secretary Alice Bonner, Commissioner of the Department of Mental Health Joan Mikula, and State Representative Denise Garlick who co-chairs the legislature’s Joint Committee on Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Recovery. Rep. Garlick is formerly the co-chair of the Joint Committee on Elder Affairs. Continue reading

Services for Individuals with I/DD in the U.S. Territories

This new grantee report outlines services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the U.S.territories. The territory report includes information about employment status, employment and education services, and trends in community living for people with disabilities living in American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Source: Administration for Community Living (ACL)

Depression in Older Adults

This fact sheet on Depression in Older Adults was created through a collaboration between Mental Health America and the National Council on Aging.

Anxiety in Older Adults

This fact sheet on Anxiety in Older Adults was created through a collaboration between Mental Health America and the National Council on Aging.

8 Easy Ways to Improve Your Heart Health

Cross-posted from Hebrew SeniorLife
By Jennifer Rhodes-Kropf, M.D., Hebrew SeniorLife

February is American Heart Health month, which makes it a great time to make changes that can improve the health of your heart. As a geriatrician at Center Communities of Brookline, I’m thrilled when patients want to make changes to positively impact their health, especially the health of the heart. Cardiovascular disease (which includes heart attack, stroke and high blood pressure) continues to be the number 1 killer of men and women in the U.S. This amazing organ needs to be protected and properly cared for to remain healthy for years to come. Continue reading

“It’s My Fault and I Just Need to Get Over it”: The Story of Ms. McKay’s Depression

By Kathy Kuhn, Center for Aging and Disability Resource (CADER), BU School of Social Work

154076562I’d like to share with you a story from my days as a social worker at Kit Clark Senior Services (KCSS).

Ms. McKay is an 82-year-old African American woman living in Dorchester. She was single, with significant hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis. Although she had a prosthetic leg, she was mobile. She had been active in her church but was recently spending more and more time alone in her apartment and not even collecting her mail. Her apartment was getting increasingly cluttered, bordering on hoarding. Continue reading

How to Identify Depression, and the Strength Behind the Pain

By Kathy Kuhn, Center for Aging and Disability Resource (CADER), BU School of Social Work

Marianne_Gontarz_How_to_Identify_Depression_BlogIn my last blog post on mental health and aging, I described Ms. McKay, an older woman who was coping with multiple losses. She had significant hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis. She had been active in her church but was spending more and more time alone in her apartment and not even collecting her mail. Her closest relative had recently moved away. She felt that nobody really cared if she even showed up. Despite the clear signs of depression, Ms. McKay’s provider did not notice them during her last doctor’s visit. Continue reading

How to Identify Depression, and the Strength Behind the Pain

By Kathy Kuhn, Center for Aging and Disability Resource (CADER), BU School of Social Work

In my last blog post on mental health and aging, I described Ms. McKay, an older woman who was coping with multiple losses. She had significant hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis. She had been active in her church but was spending more and more time alone in her apartment and not even collecting her mail. Her closest relative had recently moved away. She felt that nobody really cared if she even showed up. Despite the clear signs of depression, Ms. McKay’s provider did not notice them during her last doctor’s visit. Continue reading