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Report: How Innovative Community Responses to COVID-19 Support Healthy Aging

A new report offers insights from communities’ response during the coronavirus pandemic and demonstrates their nimbleness in creating more inclusive and equitable systems to support older people. How Innovative Community Responses to COVID-19 Support Healthy Aging is the result of a collaboration between the Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs, Massachusetts Healthy Aging Collaborative and Tufts Health Plan Foundation.

The research, conducted by FSG, highlights strategies employed by communities and offers recommendations for stronger results moving forward. The report was funded by Tufts Health Plan Foundation.

Building Inclusive Communities: A Guidebook for Advancing Health Equity in the MetroWest Region

While the title and geographic scope of the foundation’s work resides in the MetroWest region, the definitions, data and tools available in this resource can be used by any community. It should also draw special interest from Age- and Dementia Friendly stakeholders that are convening and engaging community members, conducting community assessments, gathering data, and creating action plans.

A Report on Demographics, Programs, and Services for an Age- and Dementia-Friendly Commonwealth: What We Have and What We Need

The Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs, Jewish Family & Children’s Service, and
the Tufts Health Plan Foundation convened a summit on May 9, 2016 that brought together
leaders from 84 organizations interested in age-friendly and dementia-friendly work. A need identified at the Summit was for a comprehensive look at the work currently being done on agefriendly and dementia-friendly activities. This report addresses this need by highlighting findings of an environmental scan (i.e., in-depth inventory) of dementia-friendly and age-friendly communities conducted between August 2016 and January 2017 by a research team at the Gerontology Institute of the University of Massachusetts Boston led by professors Beth Dugan and Nina Silverstein. Our aim is to not “reinvent the wheel,” but to facilitate and accelerate stakeholder progress in making Massachusetts a great place to grow up and grow old in.

A Scan of Transportation Options Available for Older People in Massachusetts

The Governor’s Council to Address Aging Issues in Massachusetts established workgroups to focus on several key areas: caregiving, employment, housing, and transportation. The transportation workgroup recognized that to make informed recommendations it needed a thorough understanding of the transportation services available to older people in Massachusetts. The first step was to conduct a scan of transportation services in the state and to learn more about national best practices.

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Boston Gerontology Institute conducted this scan during the spring of 2018 with the financial support of the Tufts Health Plan Foundation.

Age-Friendly Communities Evaluation Guide: Using Indicators to Measure Progress

The Public Health Agency of Canada has developed an Age-Friendly Communities Evaluation Guide as part of its commitment to promote the Age-Friendly Community model throughout Canada.  The guide provides information and tools to measure indicators of age-friendliness.  43 outcome indicators that are based on the eight domains of AFC are identified in the guide to help communities measure the progress of their age-friendly activities.

Source: Public Health Agency of Canada

The Livability Economy: People Places, and Prosperity

The Livability Economy: People Places, and Prosperity, a report from AARP Livable Communities, shows how livability initiatives contribute to improved economic performance and a more vibrant, desirable and competitive environment for housing and commercial investment. The report’s framework focuses on design factors that feature the following livability outcomes that benefit older adults and people of all ages. Source: AARP