Category Archives: Systems and Best Practices

Age-Friendly Boston Reveals Progressive Action Plan

After a comprehensive assessment that drew the participation of more than 4,000 older adults from 23 neighborhoods across the city, Age-Friendly Boston announced a major milestone with the release of their 75-point action plan to enhance the quality of life for residents of all ages and abilities.

At an event emceed by Boston’s Commissioner for Affairs of the Elderly Emily Shea and featuring Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, AARP Massachusetts State Director Mike Festa, Tufts Health Plan Foundation president Nora Moreno Cargie, and Secretary for the state’s Executive Office of Elder Affairs Alice Bonner, the action plan was framed as the result of an impressive grassroots-style collaboration with the support of UMass Boston. The action plan was also touted as one of the most detailed and well-constructed that has crossed AARP’s review process. Continue reading

Age-Friendly Berkshires Announces Grant to Pilot Transportation Program

Transportation for older adults is a common topic of discussion for communities looking to become more age-friendly in both urban and rural settings, and Age-Friendly Berkshires will be testing a solution for their region.

Inclusive of 32 cities and towns in a predominantly rural part of Massachusetts, Age-Friendly Berkshires joined the AARP network of age-friendly communities as a region in 2015 and is coordinating a wide range of organizations, planners, businesses and local leaders to improve healthy aging policies and practices.

The new pilot project, which will run from June to December of 2017, is funded by the National Aging & Disability Transportation Center (NADTC) and will provide transportation to pre-arranged medical visits for older adults and those with disabilities without other transportation options. Continue reading

Leveraging Resources, Learning from Each Other

By Kayla Romanelli, Program Associate, Tufts Health Plan Foundation

“How many people in the room feel maxed out?” A few brave participants slowly raised their hands. Then another question, “How many people in the room wish they had a road map to achieve their goals?” More hands went up. “Today we are going to help you build that road map.” And with that, the workshop began. Continue reading