Category Archives: Programs

“It’s My Fault and I Just Need to Get Over It”: The Story of Ms. McKay’s Depression

By Kathy Kuhn, Center for Aging and Disability Resource (CADER), BU School of Social Work

I’d like to share with you a story from my days as a social worker at Kit Clark Senior Services (KCSS).

Ms. McKay is an 82-year-old African American woman living in Dorchester. She was single, with significant hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis. Although she had a prosthetic leg, she was mobile. She had been active in her church but was recently spending more and more time alone in her apartment and not even collecting her mail. Her apartment was getting increasingly cluttered, bordering on hoarding. Continue reading

Caregiving Made a Little Easier in MetroWest

By Marty Cohen, President & CEO, MetroWest Health Foundation and Rebecca Gallo, Program Officer, MetroWest Health Foundation

Odds are if you are over 45, you already are or soon will be a caregiver. Seventy-five percent of all care received by older adults in the United States is provided by family members and friends, and many do not even identify themselves as caregivers. Continue reading

Fighting Chronic Illnesses with Evidence-Based Programs

By Rob Schreiber, MD, Medical Director, Massachusetts Healthy Living Center of Excellence

I often find myself doing things that only five years ago were being done by others. Self-checkout at the grocery store, online banking, arranging travel, self-education, and buying products over the Internet are just some of the examples that illustrate the basic fact that I must take charge. Continue reading

Improving Walkability in Fall River

By Jaime Corliss and Ben Wood, MDPH and Julie Kelly, Fall River Mass in Motion

Public health people love to talk about Policy, Systems and Environmental change (PSE for short). You probably have an understanding of what this concept means (and you may be sick of hearing about it; or if you are like us you live and love it!) but it is important to note how much this way of thinking is driving public health priority selection and resource allocation. Continue reading

Medication in Motion: The benefits of evidence-based Tai Chi for older adults

By Raymond Santos, Community Relations Director, Ethos

Falls are one of the biggest health risks for older adults. In fact, one in three adults aged 65 and older falls each year. Up to 30 percent of those who fall suffer injuries that make it difficult to move around easily, live independently and increase their chance of early death. Continue reading

What are you doing for Falls Prevention Awareness Day?

Falls are the leading cause of injuries among older adults, but there are many ways that older adults can prevent falls, including:

  • Exercise to improve strength and balance,
  • Good nutrition that includes plenty of calcium and vitamin D,
  • Reviewing medications to avoid drowsiness and dizziness,
  • Ensuring good vision through regular check-ups and wearing appropriate glasses or contact lenses,
  • Removing potential hazards at home like clutter, slippery surfaces, and poor lighting, and
  • Participating in falls prevention programs like A Matter of BalanceContinue reading

Chronic Disease Self-Management Training at the Department of Revenue

Cross-posted from WellMASS
By Ana Karchmer, CDSME Program Coordinator, MA Executive Office of Elder Affairs

Many of us have to deal with one or more chronic health conditions. Learning how to successfully manage our conditions is key to living active and productive lives. Regardless of the particular illness we might have, we all have similar emotions when dealing with chronic illnesses. We might feel angry, depressed, anxious, frustrated, and afraid. Sometimes, we may wish we had a set of “tools” we could use to help us deal with these unpleasant emotions. Continue reading

Bigger Frames for Healthy Aging

By Walter Leutz, Heller School, Brandeis University
Last week I went to a meeting of the Healthy Living Center of Excellence advisory board meeting, and I met fellow board member George Iannuzzo, who is a graduate of the Chronic Disease Self-management Program. He is on the board in part to represent the CDSMP experience, and he did it well – pointing to his dog-eared CDSMP class book as his bible and relating how his CDSMP group has transitioned into a social support group that has continued and expanded three years after the class ended. He was an articulate and forceful embodiment of the learning, empowerment and social support that these groups foster. Continue reading