News

Salem seeks to support older residents

Cross-posted from The Boston Globe

Salem is seeking community feedback on a draft plan outlining how the city can best meet the needs of its older residents. The city earlier this year became the third community in Massachusetts to join the American Association of Retired Persons’ national network of Age-Friendly Communities. The plan focuses on how the city will pursue what AARP and the World Health Organization have identified as the “eight domains” of an age-friendly community. Read the full article.

2016 Influencers in Aging

Cross-posted from NextAvenue

Meet Next Avenue’s 2016 Influencers in Aging. These 50 advocates, researchers, thought leaders, innovators, writers and experts continue to push beyond traditional boundaries and change our understanding of what it means to grow older. Read the full post

Yarmouth seniors, D-Y teens combine for model UN

Cross-posted from Wicked Local Yarmouth
By Conor Powers-Smith

A major emphasis of the World Health Organization’s Age-Friendly Communities initiative is bringing together people of all ages to share thoughts and perspectives. Yarmouth, the first town on the Cape to join the age-friendly network, held one such intergenerational event on Saturday, launching a model UN comprised of local seniors and students at D-Y High School. Continue reading

Building a village in a city for Waltham seniors

Cross-posted from Wicked Local Waltham
By

With a growing senior population, what needs to happen to make Waltham a better community for healthy aging? This was the question posed by Brandeis professor Walter Leutz in his recent study, “Healthy Aging in Waltham – Going Places?” Spanning a year and a half from its conception in December 2014 to the final report in May 2016, the study looked at what makes Waltham a good or bad place to grow old and how it can be made better. Read the full post 

Making The Economic Case For Age-Friendly Communities

Cross-posted from The Huffington Post
By John Feather, PhD CEO, Grantmakers In Aging

Follow the money. That is my advice to anyone seeking support for livable and age-friendly communities — great places to grow up and grow old.

Age-friendly, livable, lifelong communities have much to offer. Walkability. Good transit and transportation. Affordable, accessible housing. Employment and volunteer opportunities at every age. Well-coordinated health and social services. More ability to age in place. More inclusion and intergenerational connection. People of almost any age value these things, which is one reason the movement is gaining momentum around the world. Continue reading

Aging in Places: About livability and age-friendliness

Cross-posted from Wicked Local Newton
By Marian Leah Knapp

More and more I hear talk about “Livable” and “Age-friendly” communities. I see these terms in newspapers, websites, blogs, and presentations. For many years, I have been intrigued by the ideas underlying these broad concepts. Interestingly, my very first article in the Newton TAB of April 6, 2010 was on the Meaning of Aging in Place. I quote myself: Continue reading

What does a dementia friendly Massachusetts look like?

By the Massachusetts Healthy Aging Collaborative web team

“What does it take?” That was the question attendees grappled with at the Dementia Friendly Massachusetts Summit on Monday, May 9, 2016.What does it take to build a dementia friendly community—a community that is informed, safe and respectful, and enables people living with dementia and those who care about them to live full, engaged lives. Continue reading

Healthy Aging through Healthy Community Design

By the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH)

The concept of healthy aging through community design creates opportunities for municipalities to promote healthy aging by addressing the built environment. It also builds on the widely recognized “8 – 80” international movement, which recognizes the importance of establishing community design policies that provide for people of all ages.
Incorporating healthy aging principles that foster active living and access to healthy foods into community planning, land use and transportation decisions is critical to supporting healthy aging across the Commonwealth. Continue reading